Carbon in the Ground and Free Oxygen in the Air

Posted September 6, 2016

by Lensyl Urbano

A couple new article relevant to our study of Earth History.

Carbon

Image by Rajdeep Dasgupta, via pyhs.org.

Image by Rajdeep Dasgupta, via pyhs.org.

Research on the high pressure and temperature conditions at the Earth’s core suggest that most of the carbon in the early Earth should have either boiled off into space or been trapped by the iron in the core. So where did all the carbon necessary for life come from? They suggest from the collision of an embryonic planet (with lots of carbon in its upper layers) early in the formation of the solar system.

Free Oxygen

Typical surface view of purple mat surface at Middle Island showing purple filaments.  Some white filaments can also be observed. Image from Thunder Bay Sinkholes 2008 via oceanexplorer.noaa.gov.

Typical surface view of purple mat surface at Middle Island showing purple filaments. Some white filaments can also be observed. Image from Thunder Bay Sinkholes 2008 via oceanexplorer.noaa.gov.

It took a few billion years from the evolution of the first photosynthetic cyanobacteria to the time when there was enough oxygen in the atmosphere to support animal life like us. Why did it take so long? NPR interviews scientists investigating purple microbial mats in Lake Huron.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2016. Carbon in the Ground and Free Oxygen in the Air, Retrieved February 23rd, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

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