Dance Lesson

March 11, 2015

S. demonstrates a jump.

S. demonstrates a jump (Photo by Meredith F.).

This interim focuses on our global community. As a result, one of our Chinese students gave a lesson on a traditional dance. I think I made a good start at learning the twirls, but we did not have time to get to the jumps.

Trying a spin.

Trying a spin (Photo by Meredith F.).

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2015. Dance Lesson, Retrieved October 22nd, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Mitosis dance

October 17, 2010

Anaphase.

One way to represent the process of mitosis is through dance. One of my students suggested they do an interpretive dance for their natural world personal project. I think they were mostly kidding, but with a fair bit of encouragement they did end up doing it.

The dance is much more literal than it probably needs to be since I helped a bit with the final product. I still think it’s pretty useful though because it’s abstract enough that you have to know the mitosis process to figure out what’s going on. So much so, I had them perform it twice at the end of our synthesis discussion. The second time through I narrated it so the steps would be clear to everyone.

I think it might make for a good “spark the imagination” lesson if one was needed.

Right now the dance needs four people, two for the chromosomes and two for the centrioles, but it would be really neat if the entire class participated by representing the cell membrane.

The diagram with the steps is: mitosis.svg. The instructions are below.

Steps

  1. The DNA (DNA 1 and DNA 2) stand facing the audience with DNA 2 hidden behind DNA 1 since the DNA have not yet duplicated.
    • The centrioles (C1 and C2) just stand there with C2 pretending not to be there.
    • DNA 1 mimes touching the nucleus walls while DNA 2 pretends not to be there.
    • DNA 1 dances the DNA helix, which probably involves lots of hand motions and spinning around taking 23 steps to represent the number of chromosomes in humans.
  2. Replicating: DNA 2 steps forward while C 2 moves around the two DNA to get to the other side
  3. The DNA join hands and spin around (because it’s fun to do, apparently)
  4. The DNA line up next to each other and lock elbows while the centrioles start extending their threads, which probably involves some type of waving hand motion.
  5. The centrioles move in, with their threads, and grab the open elbows.
  6. The centrioles pull the DNA apart.
  7. The two DNA act out the reforming of their nuclear membranes.
  8. The DNA-centriole pairs wave each other goodbye as they become separate cells. (This is where having the rest of the group as the cell membrane would be nice.)

Steps to the mitosis dance.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2010. Mitosis dance, Retrieved October 22nd, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Evolution and/of dance

March 1, 2010

My students know my weaknesses too well. I had a well crafted argument today that I should let them watch Judson Laipply‘s YouTube video, “Evolution of Dance“. The gist of the argument was that they never really understood evolution until they saw the video (we covered evolution last year); the way the dance moves evolved, with small changes from one to the other is an excellent analogy for the gradual evolution of organisms. The best example was how The Robot changed into Breakdancing. I let them watch it of course, it was a good argument and the video is pretty harmless. And if it actually helped them learn about evolution ….

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2010. Evolution and/of dance, Retrieved October 22nd, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

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