3d Molecule Viewer

July 23, 2013

An excellent 3d viewer for molecules.

An excellent 3d molecule viewer. (The actual app has a lot smoother animations than this.)

An excellent 3d molecule viewer.

In addition to the existing molecules, you can import any number of others if you can find them in one of the right formats (PDB, SDF or MOL molecule definitions): the ligand.info: Small Molecule Meta Database is a good source for SDFs.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2013. 3d Molecule Viewer, Retrieved June 27th, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Surface Tension

May 16, 2012

Surface tension supports the water strider on the surface of the still water of the creek.

Down at the creek the water striders are out. They can stand, walk and jump on the surface of the water without penetrating the surface because of the force of surface tension that causes water molecules to stick together — it’s the same cohesive force that make water droplets stick to your skin. I got a decent set of photos to illustrate surface tension.

The water striders still create ripples on the surface of the water, even though they never break the surface.

The green canopy that over hangs the creek allows for some nice photographs.

Water strider in still water.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2012. Surface Tension, Retrieved June 27th, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Why are Earth’s Sunsets Red While Mars’ are Blue?

May 8, 2012

The area around the Sun is blue on Mars because the gasses in the thin atmosphere don't scatter much, but the Martian dust does (it scatters the red). Image via NASA.

The dust in Mars’ atmosphere scatters red, while the major gasses in Earth’s atmosphere (Nitrogen and Oxygen) scatter blue light. Longer wavelengths of light, like red, will bounce off (scatter) larger particles like dust, while shorter wavelengths, like blue light, will bounce of smaller particles, like the molecules of gas in the atmosphere. The phenomena is called Rayleigh scattering, and is different from the mechanism where different molecules absorb different wavelengths of light.

Ezra Block and Robert Krulwich go into details on NPR.

Blue sky in the upper right, but the dust scatters the red light.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2012. Why are Earth's Sunsets Red While Mars' are Blue?, Retrieved June 27th, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

3d Molecule of the Month

September 24, 2011

Cyclohexane, from the interactive model on 3Dchem.com.

Molecular models tend to fascinate. As a introduction to the chemistry of elements, students seem to like putting them together, and they tend to enjoy finding out what their molecules are called.

You can’t beat fitting together molecules by hand as a learning experience, but 3Dchem has a nice collection of interactive, three-dimensional molecules, including molecules of the month.

Periodic spiral of the elements (from 3Dchem.com).

They also have three-dimensional periodic tables showing the sizes of the atoms in the traditional tabular form as well as a spiral.

Periodic Table showing the elements by size.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2011. 3d Molecule of the Month, Retrieved June 27th, 2017, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

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