Vegetable Boxes

January 14, 2018

Harvesting turnip greens out of our vegetable boxes.

Harvesting turnip greens out of our vegetable boxes.

Two years ago we bought a greenhouse. It was aluminum framed with plastic panels. Unfortunately, its profile was not as wind-resistant as it needed to be for our campus. So last semester we built three vegetable boxes and salvaged the plastic panels from the greenhouse to build low-profile cold frames. These turned out quite nicely, and the Middle School’s Student-Run-Business’ Gardening Department have been experimenting with different types of produce.

Assembling the side panel for the cold-frames. The front and top plastic panels were salvaged from our aluminum-framed greenhouse.

Assembling the side panel for the cold-frames. The front and top plastic panels were salvaged from our aluminum-framed greenhouse.

Cilantro growing out of our raised beds with the cold-frames removed.

Cilantro growing out of our raised beds with the cold-frames removed.

The wood for the raised beds and the frames for the cold frames were purchased using funds from a grant by the Whole Kids Foundation and the pieces cut at the TechShop.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2018. Vegetable Boxes, Retrieved February 23rd, 2018, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Teaching Organic Farming

August 13, 2013

One of these days I’d like to put in a garden at school. Or maybe a few gardens. An indoor hydroponic system would be nice for the winter months, as would a greenhouse. However, the easiest thing to start with might be putting in some raised beds. To this end, the University of Santa Cruz’s Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems has detailed information in their Teaching Organic Farming & Gardening: Resources for Instructors manual.

Mr. Sansone.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2013. Teaching Organic Farming, Retrieved February 23rd, 2018, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Radish Leaf Pesto

May 1, 2012

In addition to eating the bulbs of the radishes, the leaves are also edible. I heartily endorse Clotilde Dusoulier’s Radish Leaf Pesto. The slight spiciness of the leaves gives it a delightful frisson.

Radish leaf pesto.

Pesto recipes are pretty flexible. I added some fresh cilantro from the garden, some frozen basil leaves, used ground almonds for the nut component, a bit of Manchego for the cheese, and doubled the garlic. I also added a little white wine to reduce the viscosity. I quite liked the end result — we had it on pasta — even if some others though it was a little too adventurous.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2012. Radish Leaf Pesto, Retrieved February 23rd, 2018, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

Radishes

April 29, 2012

Radishes ready for harvest.

The radishes did well this year. Planted in containers on March 29th (in St. Louis, USA), they were harvested one month later. The short, early season means that they’re a workable crop for school. Students can plant, harvest, and consume them all within a semester.

The CDC’s Fruit and Vegetable of the Month website has a little history, some information about the varieties, nutritional information, recipes, and more information about radishes. The University of Illinois Extension also has information about planting and growing.

NutritionData.self.com has some very nice graphical representations of the nutritional value of the food (although their serving size is 1 cup of slices, which seems a bit much).

These sites, however, focus on the radish bulbs, and not on the fact that the leaves are edible. Radish Leaf Pesto is quite good.

Harvested radishes. Both the red bulbs and the green leaves are edible. You'll note that radishes also spot a long tap-root.

Citing this post: Urbano, L., 2012. Radishes, Retrieved February 23rd, 2018, from Montessori Muddle: http://MontessoriMuddle.org/ .
Attribution (Curator's Code ): Via: Montessori Muddle; Hat tip: Montessori Muddle.

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